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The Disappearance

By David Haldane

Nov. 22, 2018

We met, I suppose, in the usual way for the beginnings of such relationships. If there is a usual way. And if, indeed, there have been such relationships. He was sitting on the ground at the entrance of the local Gaisano Mall with his hand out. I was walking by with my seven-year-old son in tow.

“Daddy,” my boy said, “look at that man. What does he want?”

It was if I’d been hit by a bag of cement. For, in truth, my immediate instinct had been to look the other way and hurry past. But now my son was watching, and that was a game changer.

“He wants money,” I explained as carefully as I could. “He needs it because he’s poor.” I reached into my pocket and withdrew all the loose change I could find, perhaps twenty pesos worth.“Here, Isaac,” I said, handing him the money, “why don’t you give him this?”

And that’s how it started; a seemingly innocuous relationship that didn’t appear to be very deep. I never expected to be so distraught when it suddenly ended a few months later. Sometimes, I guess, the things you take for granted are the ones that hit the hardest.

I should probably add here that Surigao City’s main mall and I are hardly strangers. Truth be told, in fact, I generally spend a portion of almost every day there, primarily to take advantage of the fastest Internet connection in town. So as the days passed and I continued seeing the man I came to think of as the Gaisano Beggar, well, we gradually developed a daily routine. At first, it was as innocuous as I considered our relationship to be; he would simply hold out his hand at my approach and I would fill it with whatever spare change I could muster.

Then it began to change. He would see me approaching from a distance and smile. Eventually, it got to the point where, if I’d given him something on the way in, he’d refrain from extending his hand later as I passed the other way. The message was clear; “You’ve already done your part today,” he seemed to be saying, “so I won’t bother you for more. Have a good day…” Sometimes I would even gesture that I didn’t have any change on me at the moment but would catch him on the way out, and he would nod in apparent understanding.

Then one day came the ultimate exchange, a moment that turned out to be the apex of our relationship; he actually uttered the words “thank you” in English. It was the first time the Gaisano Beggar had ever spoken to me. And the last. For the next day as I entered the mall at the usual time, the man with the eagerly outstretched hand was nowhere to be found.

At first, I thought it a fluke. Perhaps the rain had dissuaded him, or he was feeling ill. I tried to imagine where my friend-of-the-many-fingers lived. Did he have a wife and family waiting for him at home, eager for the day’s meager earnings? Did they all sleep together under a bridge downtown?

As the days passed with still no sign of the beggar had befriended, curiosity turned to alarm. Perhaps the mall’s management had banned him from the site. Maybe he’d been arrested. Or, worse, was he lying dead somewhere in the middle of a road?

It was then that I began to reflect on all that had transpired. For, in some strange way, this poor man had gotten under my skin, become part of my life, evolved into a fixture and an object of anticipation. In truth, he had become one of the anchors of my life; a strange new life in a strange new land where anchors were achingly few. And it occurred to me then how ironic it is that so many of our anchors are invisible until they disappear.

I still look for the man with his hand out each day. Perhaps one day I will experience the great relief of finding him.

 

 

 

 

 

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A former Los Angeles Times staff writer and winner of a 2018 Golden Mike award in radio broadcast journalism, David Haldane fell in love with the Philippines on his first visit there in 2003. A few visits later, he also fell in love with the beautiful young Filipina to whom he is now married and, with whom, he has returned many times. David has written extensively about his experiences in the Philippines for several publications including Orange Coast and Islands Magazine. Today he and Ivy, along with their eight-year-old son, Isaac, divide their time between homes in Joshua Tree, California, and Surigao City, Philippines. His award-winning memoir, Nazis & Nudists, recounts, among other things, the courtship of Ivy and finding a place to call home. For David that turned out to be at the tip of a peninsula marking the gateway to Mindanao where he and Ivy are building their dream home next to a lighthouse overlooking the sea. This blog is the chronicle of that adventure.

 

 

 

 

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Also Published in Mindanao Gold Star Daily

 

8 Comments

  1. John Reyes says:

    “It was then that I began to reflect on all that had transpired. For, in some strange way, this poor man had gotten under my skin, become part of my life, evolved into a fixture and an object of anticipation. In truth, he had become one of the anchors of my life; a strange new life in a strange new land where anchors were achingly few. And it occurred to me then how ironic it is that so many of our anchors are invisible until they disappear.” – David Haldane

    This passage is so awesome, David! Sometimes those anchors are all around us, we’re just too busy to notice them.

  2. Rob Ashley says:

    “There are a thousand ways to kneel and kiss the earth.” – Rumi These small things we do are so important, eh? I have similar relationships and rituals. Another person really couldn’t understand the significance they have for me. -Rob

  3. Stephen Talpas says:

    I always said, you have a metaphor for everything. The line about invisible anchors is so true. Trust me, that one hit home. I think the beggar will show up again.

  4. Another insightful piece sir,

    I have nothing to add. Please keep them coming.

    Take care,
    Pete

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